Alexander Ware (1825)

“Brigadier General Ware to Governor Troup.

Line Creek, Fayette County, Ga.

May 1, 1825.

Governor Troup :

The information you have no doubt received by Chilly McIntosh and other Indians, will be confirmed by the following relation of the circumstances attending the horrid transaction on the Chatahoochie and Tallapoosa, in the Creek nation. On the morning of the 30th April, several neighbors of mine, who lodged on the banks of the Chatahoochie, this side of McIntosh’s, about day break heard the war whoop, and they supposed from 2 to 400 guns were fired—the houses were on fire when they set off. An intelligent Indian, Col. Miller, who has fled to my house, together with about 150 others, states that he supposes there is upwards of 400 warriors of the hostile party, embodied on the Chatahoochie,at McIntosh’s, feasting upon all the cattle they can find, hogs, &,c. belonging to the friendly party : states, also, that they have taken McIntosh’s negroes, and all other property they can find. They, he states, intend marching toward the settlement of the whites in three days; in this I am a little incredulous, though so far as the resources of our country will afford, I will be prepared. Major Finley Stewart is collecting some volunteers to go out and reconnoitre the country ; he will set off as soon as practicable. He, Col. Miller, supposes, including numbers long cloaked under the garb of friendship, who, since the death of McIntosh, have joined the hostile party, that the hostile party in the nation largely exceeds 4000 warriors, and that the friendly party amount now to only about 500; they implore protection—they need it—they are constantly coming in —say the road is covered with others.

Very respectfully,

ALEX. WARE.

Some provision ought to be made to supply those refugees with food.”

Reference Data:

Report on the Select Committee of the House of Representatives, by United States Congress, House, Select committee on the Georgia question relative to Creek Indians, 1827, page 147


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