Early Virginia Immigrants, 1623-1666 from book published 1912 by George Cabell Greer

Each line contains from left to right:
   LAST & FIRST - Name of immigrant who came to America
   ARRIVAL -  Year of immigrant arrival
   SPONSOR - Name of sponsoring person(s) paying passage of immigrant
   COUNTY - County in which sponsor received land for payment of passage

Items in the listing below are separated by tabs to make it easy to cut and paste
into a spreadsheet or database.  Unfortunately, that also creates column alignment
problems for this display.  There are over 17,000 names of immigrants and over
25,000 names including the sponsors.  The original book had many alphabetizing errors, 
which have been corrected with computerized sorting.

Scanning the 300+ pages and correcting the many errors has been a labor of love as
partial repayment for those genealogists (professional and non) who have given me gifts.

Allen Price, 2011


LAST	FIRST	ARRIVAL	SPONSOR		COUNTY

Ware	John	1655	Peter Ford	Gloucester		
Ware	John	1653	William Johnson	Lancaster		
Ware	Jon Jr	1653	John Ware	???		
Ware	Jon Sr & wife	1653	John Ware	???		
Ware	Nicholas	1648	George White	Lower Norfolk		
Ware	Thomas	1652	Ambrose Dixon & Stephen Horsely Jr	Northampton		
Ware	William	1641	Thomas Bernard	Warwick River

Rev. John Quincy Adams Ware (1822 – 1865)

Rev John Quincy Adams Ware
Added by: Ann Tindall

Find A Grave photo
“John Quincy Adams Ware was the son of Capt. Benjamin and Martha (Chapin) Ware. He was born in Gilsum, December 17, 1822. When a youth, he was considered a young man of correct habits, strong to labor, of literary tastes, and showing considerable ability in lyceum debated and .

After reaching maturity, he embraced sceptical views, though he did not refrain from attending divine worship and listening to the gospel. During the preaching of Rev. Mark Carpenter in Gilsum, while he settled in Keene, Mr. Ware was suddenly arrested by the power of the Holy Spirit, and immediately yielded himself to the claims of the Gospel.

To prepare himself for the work of the ministry, he pursued a thorough course of study at New Hampton, soon after which he came to Marlborough, and entered at once upon the duties of a preacher and pastor.

Mr. Ware was a man of considerable energy, naturally social and generous-hearted. Physically, there were not many his equal. He was full six feet in stature, weighing one hundred and eighty pounds. He was a man of more than ordinary ability, one whose air and mien made his presence felt. His style of composition for the pulpit was that of strength rather than ornament of rhetoric and gloss of diction. His manner of speaking was open, earnest, and impressive.

After closing his labors here, he went to Sanbornton, where he remained four years; thence to Addison, Vt., where he labored two years, and then to Whiting, Vt., where he remained till his death.

While a member of the Addison County Baptist Association of Vermont, he occupied a position of influence and prominence, showing that he had a power which he could wield for good in the Association. He was many times chosen its moderator, and took a more or less conspicuous part in all its deliberations. The people of Whiting, while he was a resident there, paid him a tribute of respect — not only as a minister, but as a man — in choosing him moderator of their town-meetings, which duties he ably discharged, and by his influence sometimes carried measures which otherwise would have failed.

The history of the church in Whiting, over which he was pastor six years, shows what his influence was to build up a society; and although his record was not so great as he himself could have wished, yet it was very creditable.

Being a man of good physical constitution, he was able to preform and endure more mental labor than many of his contemporaries. While on business at his sister’s (Mrs. Bradley Britton) in Surry, he was taken sick, and died suddenly, August 29, 1865.”

Rev John Quincy Adams Ware
Added by: Linda M. Welch

Find A Grave

William Montgomery Ware (1946 -1901)

William Montgomery Ware
Added by: t. garlow

A LOOK AT THE LIFE OF OUR GREAT-GRANDFATHER,
WILLIAM MONTGOMERY WARE

A 15 year-old Private, in Company ‘M’ 7th Indiana Cavalry Volunteers, Civil War ( which at the war’s end, before William was mustered-out, became Company ‘B’ ).

“5-feet 9-inches, light hair, blue eyes” was listed on William’s Civil War *Pension application decades later, at 40 years of age (*Pension is attached here in the photo section).
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William’s father and mother, Isaac Newton Ware and Johannah Groenendyke, married on October 11, 1846 in Henry Co., Indiana.
William, the second child, was born on August 22, 1848 in New Lisbon, Henry Co., Indiana.
William’s mother, Johannah (Hannah) Groenendyke/Ware, died on September 16, 1856, when he had barely turned 8 years of age.

He continued living on the family farm, with his father, Isaac Newton Ware, and William’ new step-mother, Mary Ann Huddleston/Doran/Ware, and Hannah and Isaac’ other children; John Addison Ware, James Monroe Ware, and Mary Jane Ware.
*(John Addison’s 1875 marriage proposal letter is attached to his findagrave page.)

Also, in the household, are Mary Ann’ two children, Mary Josephine Doran, and Sarah Elizabeth Doran, from Mary Ann’ first marriage to Samuel H. Doran, who had also died in 1856.
The widower, Isaac N Ware, had married the widow, Mary Ann Doran, on September 30, 1858 in Wayne Co., Indiana, a couple years after the death of both of their spouses.

Five years later, at the age of 15 years and 2 weeks, William enlisted in Company M, at Indianapolis, Indiana on Sept. 6, 1863; enlisting during the War for 3 years of service.

Then, Union forces being led by General William ‘Sooy’ Smith, ordered to rendezvous with Major General William Tecumseh Sherman, engaged in a battle at Okolona, Mississippi on Feb. 22, 1864 before catching up with General Sherman. William Ware was captured there, at the age of 15 years and 6 months, by Confederate forces led by Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest. William was taken to the notorious Andersonville Prison in Georgia.
It had only been 5 months since leaving his father’s farm to enlist in the Cavalry.

Of the 45,000 prisoners held here during the War, 13,000 died. The chief causes of death were; scurvy, diarrhea, and dysentery. Prisoner-friends, provided a little extra food, care, safety from gangs of fellow prisoners, and moral support for the others in their social network. This helped them to survive, while many of those without friends did not. Life for these enlisted men, consisted of living, eating, and sleeping on the open muddy, cold ground, with open latrines close-by. They mostly had only the clothes on their backs, and some of those, and shoes, were stolen by the gangs; as well as food.

Having survived the first seven months, on Sept.13 1864, William was sent to the just built, infamous, Florence Stockade in South Carolina, arriving on Oct 5, 1864. Several thousand men, only the ones who were still able to walk, were sent there to avoid having them liberated by Union-General Sherman’s advance through Georgia. Much of the trip was by rail-car.
The death rate here, was 20 to 30 prisoners per day, 2,800 in total, in 5 months.
John McElroy, who was also imprisoned in both prisons, states in his 1879 book ‘Andersonville: a Story of Rebel Military Prisons’, “I think also that all who experienced confinement in the two places are united in pronouncing Florence to be, on the whole, much the worse place and more fatal to life.”

William was paroled at Savannah, Georgia on Nov.30, 1864.
December 1864, William was sent to doctors up north at Annapolis due to “exposure and insufficient food”, and then in January and February of 1865, while on furlough, he went to his doctor in his hometown of Dublin, Indiana.

He then continued in the service after his brief rehabilitation. He had enlisted for a 3 year term, and in this Regiment, they held the soldiers to their commitment. Even after the War had ended, William was still in active service in the 7th Calvary for about 9 more months.
Many other men of the Regiment tried leaving during this time after the War’s end, to go back to their parents, families and farms. Most were farmers, or sons of farmers, as was William. There was much work to be done on the farms; most farmers had pretty large families to feed.

Newly promoted General George Armstrong Custer, at this time was being escorted by William’s 7th Indiana Cavalry from Alexandria, Louisiana, to Austin, Texas. William, who was now only a short time out of prison, was back with his old Company. Custer decided to make a point of what he would do to ‘deserters’.

Custer caught two men from the Regiment who were leaving for home; he had them placed in front of a firing squad without a hearing or court-martial, and had every man in the Regiment, including our William, turn-out to witness the execution. The Officers knew that the military rules required trials before any such actions, but of course they were out-ranked by the General.

William was Mustered-out of Co. B, of the Indiana 7th Cavalry, at Austin, TX Feb. 18, 1866, after the 7th Indiana Cavalry had escorted the newly appointed General after the War had ended.
**Some interesting, and some terrible exploits of this trip, are told of in the book that you can read for yourself. That title and its location, is listed later in this biography.

William was now 17 years, 3 months of age. The soldiers went by steamboat, up the Mississippi, and then by railroad, back home to Indiana.

**Earlier, there had been a terrible disaster on the Mississippi, of a seriously over-loaded large steamboat capsizing, killing several hundred of just-released prisoners from Andersonville Prison.
William had ‘not’ been on this boat, since he had earlier been sent to the Florence Stockade from Andersonville.
*********

A true story handed down from William’s daughter Jennie, through her William Haist family was:

“William Ware, while in the Cavalry, had a horse with an awkward gait that was not exactly pleasant to ride. He traded horses with a fellow soldier, who had a smaller horse, a mare, with an easy gait.”

“William, with the smaller, slower mare, was captured (at the battle of Okolona) and sent to Andersonville Prison; while his friend, with William’s former, larger faster horse, was able to outrun his pursuers, and was able to escape capture.”

**(from William’s Civil War Pension papers, we know that William had been captured on Feb. 22, 1864 at Okolona, Mississippi. Have found the details of that day’s fighting and retreat, from a commander’s diary; have listed an excerpt of it below.)
*********

From the book ‘History of the Seventh Indiana Volunteers…’
…”On Feb. 22,1864, at the battle of Okolona, Mississippi, the Indiana 7th Cavalry, while other Union Cavalry units were desperately retreating all around and through the ranks of the 7th, the 7th Indiana mounted and lined up, and staged a valiant Sabre’ charge, across an open field against General Forest’ Confederate forces, who were lined up to repel the charge. At first successful, but when Confederate reinforcements arrived, the Indiana 7th Cavalry, also retreated.
…Desperate fighting of the 7th Indiana, makes a brilliant sabre charge at Ivy Farm, and saves the army from capture.”

**********
The below entry is from the:
‘Directory and Soldiers Register of Wayne county, Indiana’
1865. $5.00
W.H. Lanthurn & Co., Publishers Richmond, Ind.

Ware, William enlisted in Co. M, 7th Reg.Ind Vol Cav; was captured in the battle of Okolona, and confined for some time in Andersonville prison, was paroled, afterward exchanged, and is still in the service, July 1865. Son of Isaac N. Ware, Jackson tp.

***Note****
For a one-of-a-kind Civil War experience, from the personal diary of the author, combined with the first-hand experiences he collected just after the War from several of his fellow officers in their Indiana 7th Calvary; you can share in the ‘day to day’ exploits of the ‘men’, including our 15 year-old William, in the 7th Indiana Cavalry.

From the day of his ‘mustering-in’ and the very funny ‘Grand-Review’ in front of the Governor of Indiana to every detail leading up to the day of the battle that William was captured in, including the ‘sabre’ charge’, to the escorting of General Custer, after William had got out of prison, to the day of William being ‘mustered-out’ of the Cavalry, after the War’s end.

William Ware is listed in the book, in Company ‘M’, and again as captured on the day of the ‘Battle of Okolona’, Mississippi.

It was written during, and completely finished after the war, by Thomas S. Cogley, First Lieutenant Company ‘F’, 7th Indiana Cavalry, and published in 1876, and then republished in the early 1880s.

** ‘History of the Seventh Indiana Cavalry Volunteers and the Expeditions, Campaigns, Raids, Marches and Battles of the Armies with which it was Connected’, by Thomas Sydenham Cogley;
eBook is digitized to read online at;
https://books.google.com/books?id=nH1BAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA01&dq=7th+indiana+cavalry&hl=en&sa=X&ei=IxstU4HjE46-oQTYuoEo#v=onepage&q=7th%20indiana%20cavalry&f=false

**Also, William’s first cousin John Lutz Ware, is listed in the book, in the Indiana 7th Cavalry Company ‘E’.
*A great Civil War ‘armed for battle’ photo of the above, John L. Ware, has been posted by John’s descendant, Carolyn, on ‘findagrave’. John and our William were in the 7th Indiana Cavalry together, but in different Companies.

************
***A personal ‘diary’ of life (and death) at Andersonville (Prison) written by a prisoner (during the time when our William was sent there), is digitized to read online at:

https://archive.org/details/andersonvilledia01rans

‘Andersonville Diary,ESCAPE and LIST OF THE DEAD, NAME, CO., REGIMENT, DATE OF DEATH and No. of Grave in Cemetery’

-AUTHOR AND PUBLISHER-John L. Ransom, LATE FIRST SERGEANT NINTH MICH. CAV.
1881
—-
—“DEDICATION—
TO THE MOTHERS, WIVES AND SISTERS OF THOSE WHOSE NAMES ARE HEREIN RECORDED AS HAVING DIED IN ANDERSONVILLE,
This Book is respectfully dedicated by the author.”

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COMMISSIONERS PROCEEDINGS.
January 10, 88.
Wm. Ware is appointed justice and assessor of O’Fallon precinct.

‘Lincoln County tribune. (North-Platte, Neb.) January 14, 1888’
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COMMISSIONERS PROCEEDINGS.
Jan. 11.-Wm. Ware was appointed Justice of the Peace for O’Fallons precinct, also assessor for same precinct and bonds approved for both offices.

‘Lincoln County tribune. (North-Platte, Neb.) January 21, 1888’
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Don’t forget the Sunday school picnic at Wm. Ware’s grove Saturday, Sept. 9th.

‘The North Platte semi-weekly tribune’, August 25, 1899.
*************
Wm. Ware recently purchase a fine three seated light spring wagon of W. H. Hill at Hershey.

‘The North Platte semi-weekly tribune’, February 20, 1900.
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Wm. Ware is doing the mason work on the new addition to W.H. Hill’s residence in Hershey.

‘The North Platte semi-weekly tribune’, Friday May 25, 1900.
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Wm. Ware is on the sick list again at this time.

‘The North Platte semi-weekly tribune’, Friday November 2, 1900.
*************
Ware and McKellips’ public auction of cattle, horses, hogs, farm machinery and household effects which took place last Wednesday with Wm. Ware as auctioneer was well attended and good prices prevailed. All but a few of the purchasers paid cash and saved the discount of five per cent.

‘The North Platte Semi-Weekly Tribune’, Tuesday November 20, 1900.
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John Batt and Co. sold today one hundred head of cattle, which were in transit, to Wm. Ware for twenty-six hundred dollars. Mr. Ware is stocking up the Pawnee ranch rapidly, buying a hundred head or so each week or two.

‘The North Platte semi-weekly tribune’, May 24, 1901, (image 5).
*************
Wm. Ware is quite ill at his home just west of Hershey.

‘The North Platte semi-weekly tribune’ September 10, 1901.
*************
Wm. Ware is still quite ill and is under the care of Dr. Dennis of the county seat.

‘The North Platte semi-weekly tribune’ September 13, 1901.
*************
Wm. Ware we are told is still in a critical condition with but faint hopes of recovery.
…Miss Jennie Ware lost her pocket book between Hershey and Wm. Ware’s farm one evening the last of last week containing better than $12.00. A reward will be paid to the finder by leaving the same at I.E. Ware & Co’s store in Hershey.

‘The North Platte semi-weekly tribune’ September 20, 1901.

*************
We are pleased to learn that Wm. Ware is slowly convalescing from his late illness.

‘The North Platte semi-weekly tribune’ October 1, 1901.

*************
William Ware
Aug 22,1848-Oct 5,1901

Wm. Ware an old pioneer of this county and who has been seriously ill for some time died of a complication of diseases at his home west of Hershey on Saturday last at nine o’clock, The funeral was held at the M.E.. church in Hershey the following day at two o’clock, which was attended by a large concourse of sorrowing neighbors and friends. The interment took place at the O’Fallons cemetery, he was a man who had boats of friends who deeply regret his demise. He was an old veteran of the rebellion and spent nine months of the time in Andersonville prison and was never a healthy man after that- He was always first in church affairs as well as in the G.A.R.- A wife,several sons and daughters survive him all of whom have the sympathy of numerous friends in the valley.

‘The North Platte semi-weekly tribune’., October 08, 1901
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*received the below 1901 obituary from Glenn Montgomery

Died.
At his home near Hershey,Neb. Oct. 5, 1901, William Montgomery Ware, aged 53 years, 1 month and 13 days.
Mr. Ware was born near Dublin Henry county, Ind., Aug.22,1848. When less than fifteen years of age he enlisted in the 7th Indiana Cavalry and served nearly three years, being discharged at the close of the war. In his early manhood he came to eastern Iowa, and in 1872 was united in marriage to Mrs. Mary Anderson. In a few years they moved to eastern Nebraska, then in 1886 to Lincoln county where they settled at their present home.
Mr. Ware was a consistent Christian. For many years he was a member of the United Brethren church but since coming here united with the M.E. church, there being no U.B. organization here. He was an active and beloved member of the church here, being one of the trustees since the erection of the church.
Mr. Ware had been in poor health for more (unreadable) ago was taken ill with catarrhal fever and congestion of the lungs. Everything possible for his recovery was done, but all efforts were in vain and Saturday morning at 9 o’clock he went peacefully Home. After being told Friday that he could not live he said, “God’s will be done,” and calmly gave directions as to his funeral, the settling of his estate, comforted each loved one individually, left messages for absent ones, and without fear or doubt entered the dark valley.
He leaves a wife, four sons, six daughters, and a sister, besides more distant relatives and hosts of friends to mourn his loss. all of his own family was with him at the time of his death excepting one son who had been here but, thinking his father out of danger, had returned to his home in the eastern part of the state.
The funeral was held at the home Sunday afternoon and in spite of the heavy rain was attended by a large number of sympathizing friends. Rev. Gilpin, pastor of the M.E. church, assisted by Rev. Evans of the Baptist church, conducted the funeral service, and the remains were laid to rest in Riverside cemetery.
Sympathy is extended to the sorrowing family and may they find comfort in his dying words, “Thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.”
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‘The North Platte semi-weekly tribune’, October 11, 1901.

H. H. Hollingworth has recently moved to the farm of the late Wm. Ware.
**(He moved in to help the widow, Mrs. Ware, with her farm;
Milton H. Hollingworth married daughter, Jessie Ware)
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‘The North Platte semi-weekly tribune’, December 20, 1901.

A few head of cattle on the farm of the late Wm. Ware died lately from the corn stalk disease.
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(William did not live long enough to see the marriages of two of his daughters, that were only 2 1/2 months after his death)
‘The North Platte semi-weekly tribune’, December 24, 1901.

Brothers Will Wed Twin Sisters.
Tomorrow Rev. C.P. Wimberly of this city will officiate at two weddings at Hershey which will be somewhat out of the ordinary so far as the contracting parties are concerned. In this double ceremony two brothers will marry twin sisters . The brides will be Misses Estella and Luella Ware, daughters of Mrs. Wm. Ware, and the grooms Thomas and Albert McConnell. Thomas will marry Miss Estella and Albert Miss Luella. the ceremony will occur at the Ware home.

The Misses Ware are very worthy and popular young ladies who have lived on the farm near Hershey for a number of years. The Messrs. McConell have resided in the valley for five or six years and are very industrious and capable young men who have made a gratifying success of farming. In advance The Tribune extends congratulations.
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Arthur Harvey and Miss Maggie Ware will be united in marriage at the home of the bride’s mother, Mrs. Wm. Ware, on Sunday next. Rev. Derreberry of Paxton will perform the ceremony.

(‘The North Platte Semi-Weekly Tribune’ North Platte, Nebraska-August 29, 1902)
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
John Ware has about a car load of fall wheat for sale which he grew this season on the farm belonging to his mother, Mrs. Wm. Ware.

(‘The North Platte Semi-Weekly Tribune’ North Platte, Nebraska-Sept. 5, 1902)
______________________________________
______________________________________
Below is from the book:
‘An Illustrated History of Lincoln Co, Neb. and her People: A Narrative of the past with emphasis on the pioneer period…’
Chicago and New York, The National Historical Society 1920.

1. Everett Ware, vice president of the Bank of Lincoln county at Hershey, was born in Mount Pleasant, on March 3, 1875, and is a son of William and Mary (Webb) Ware, the former of whom was a native of Indiana and the latter bore the distinction of being the first white child born in the county of Mount Pleasant, Iowa. They became the parents of eleven children, of whom eight are living, namely: Jennie, the wife of W. M. Haist, of North Platte; I. Everett, the subject of this sketch; Edward, of Hershey; Maggie, the wife of Arthur Harvey, of Cheyenne, Wyoming; Luella, the wife of Albert McConnell, of North Platte; John, of Hershey; Ralph, of Cheyenne, Wyoming; Cora, the wife of John Jacobson, of Hershey. William Ware, the father of these children, following farming in Iowa until 1878, afterward he resided in Nuckolls county, Nebraska, until 1886, when he came to Lincoln county, homesteaded a tract of land, and thereafter devoted himself to agricultural pursuits during the remainder of his life, his death occurring in October, 1901. He was survived by his widow, whose death occurred in November, 1907. Mr. Ware was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, which affiliation was particularly consonant from the fact that he spent three years in the service of this country during the Civil war, as a member of Company B of the Seventh regiment of Indiana cavalry, having enlisted when but fifteen years of age. He spent about nine months of that period in the notorious Andersonville prison pen, where he endured untold hardships and sufferings, and from the effects of which experience he never fully recovered his health. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and was originally a republican in politics, but late in life changed his support to the democratic party.
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**Note
William Ware’ first child, Mabel, was born 13 months after William was mustered-out of the War. ( William had gone from Texas, back home to his father’s farm in Indiana by way of steam boat, and then train.)

Mabel was born March 16, 1867 in Dublin, Wayne Co, Indiana.
She shows up on the 1870 census, living with her mother Sarah Doran, living in the household of William’ father, Isaac Newton Ware and William’ stepmother, Mary Ann Huddleston/Ware. William had moved to Wisconsin.


Mabel’ father and mother, then have each left the farm, and then were married to separate people, leaving Mabel to be raised by Isaac and Mary Ware, most likely because of the then stigma, of having a child outside of marriage.

By the 1880 census, Mabel is still living with William’ stepmother, and Isaac has since died in 1878. The widow Mary Ware, lists Mabel, at least with the census taker, as her own daughter.
Mabel’s newspaper obituary erroneously said that Mabel’s mother had died when Mabel was young, and that she was raised by, Mrs. Josephine Needham (who is Mabel’ aunt, Josephine Doran/Needham).

Mabel, as a young teen, goes on to become the organist for the Sunday School and the church, graduate from high school, and then marries Parker B. Swartzel, a professional baseball player from Dublin, Indiana, on Dec. 31, 1889, in Richmond, Wayne Co, Indiana. Soon after marriage, she then opens a Millinery store in the same building where they live; and later after his baseball career, Parker gets into the hardware business, and they later made money in real estate transactions in Los Angeles County, California.
‘Park’ dies in 1940 in Glendale, Los Angeles Co, CA.
Mabel dies on Aug 10, 1941 in Glendale, Los Angeles, CA.
Two of Parker B. Swartzel’s baseball photos are on his baseball-cards, which are posted on his findagrave memorial page.

**Mabel and Parker, had only one child, Cedric B. Swartzel-age 8. The son was only on the one census, in 1900 in Jackson, Wayne Co, Indiana.
Cannot find a burial as of yet. He is not mentioned in Mabel’ obituary.
**( A newspaper article from Oct.7, 1901- 8 year-old Cedric’ tragic death, from an accident in Santiago Canyon in Orange, Orange County, CA., with their horse and carriage, on Oct.6th. * See Mabel’s findagrave memorial page; the link is below ).
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**Note
William Ware’ first marriage, was to Mary Jane Stewart, in Reedsburg, Sauk Co, Wisconsin, in 1868. They had one child together, Carrie B. Ware. The child’s’ name was included in the 1872 divorce and child custody documents in Iowa.

After much research, we have found who is very likely, the child Carrie, who was last documented on the June 9 & 10th-1880 census living in Liberty, Nuckolls Co, Nebraska, with her father William, and his 2nd wife Mary (Webb), and their children. She was listed as (William’) daughter Corra B. Ware, 11 years old, born in Wisconsin.
On the 1885 Nebraska ‘State’ census, she is not listed. Her where-a-bouts had eluded all modern-day family members to this day.

However with the aid of modern computers, a very likely finding of William’s daughter, Carrie B. Ware, is
Carrie Belle Wier Paist, “daughter of William Wier”.

She was born Aug. 16, 1868 in Wisconsin.
She died Dec. 17, 1940 in Camas, Clark Co, Washington.
The birth year and month matches up, the birth State matches up, the father’s name matches (the different spelling of the last name has the same pronunciation as Ware).
The fact that she does not ever state her birth-mother’s first name or maiden name, and her birth-mother’s birth State is ‘unknown’, also matches up.

The actual daughter of our William, Carrie B. Ware; was ‘stolen away’ from her mother’s residence as a baby, after her mother and William had separated. This explains why she would not know her birth-mother’s name or birth State.
This had happened before the divorce and child custody court documents were finalized in 1871 in Des Moines County, Iowa. In the divorce document, the child is listed as Carrie B. Ware and William is granted the custody of Carrie, which was what he had asked for.
(Samuel M. Shortridge, the husband of William’s aunt, worked as an attorney on the divorce for William, as William and his brother, James Monroe Ware, were living with his aunt and uncle at that time, in Iowa.)

After the ‘kidnapping’, Carrie was raised in the William Ware household, along with William’s second wife Mary Webb/Ware, and their children. She is listed on the 1880 census, as Corra B. Ware, living with her father and his family.
——–
The husband of our ‘suspected’ Carrie, was Harry C. Paist, they were married on March 26, 1898 in Kearney, Buffalo Co, Nebraska. Kearney is very close to where our Carrie was last located in 1880. And is the same location as our Carrie’s half sister, Jennie Ware, and Carrie’s step-mother, Maria Ware, traveled to in the late 1800’s.
Harry Paist, apparently died in the Iowa State Hospital that he was in for many years.
His parents are Jonathan Forester Paist, , and Susanne Paist.

*****************************************************************

———-A 150 YEAR ANNIVERSARY REMEMBRANCE, from 1864 to 2014———-

*****************************************************************
****In remembrance of the soldiers, of the 7th Indiana Cavalry, for this Veteran’s Day 2014;
below is an excerpt (of several first-hand accounts), about the Battle where William was captured while he was in Company ‘M’; from the book ‘History of the 7th Indiana Cavalry…’ published 1876.
—————

“PREPARATIONS FOR BATTLE (FEBRUARY, 1864)

At three o’clock on the morning of the 17th, the brigade was mounted and on the march. On this day Smith‘s army was concentrated. The 1st brigade was commanded by Col. George E. Waring, Jr., of the 4th Missouri; the 2d by Col. Hepburn, and the 8d by Col. McCrillis. Seven thousand mounted men make a great show. The day was clear, and the sun shone brightly. The long line as it filed out on its march, with its nodding guidons and waving banners, as it wound along the road, the proud step of the steeds chomping their bits, and the glean of the brightly polished arms, presented a spectacle grand and splendid in the highest degree.”

Feb. 22, 1864
“The enemy ceased firing and watched with interest the preparations for the “charge”.

Members of the 7th Indiana dismounted and threw down the fence in front, so the cavalry could charge through.

Everything being ready, Gen. Smith, who had personally directed the formation of the troops, rode up to the 7th Indiana, and said, “Col. Shanks, charge!”. The Colonel gave the command, “Draw sabres!” and in an instant every blade flashed in the setting sun-light. “Forward, charge” rang along the line, which was repeated by the bugles sounding the “charge”, then off shot the column, like a thunderbolt, down the hill to the ravine, over it, into the ranks of the enemy, through a storm of bullets from their muskets, and shells from their guns. Sabres clashed on muskets, and muskets were fired in the faces of the assailants, or used as clubs over their heads. Owing to the nature of the ground some of the regiment were unable to get close enough to the rebels to use their sabres. Under a galling fire they coolly returned them to their scabbards, drew their revolvers and poured such a deadly fire that it caused confusion in their ranks. The sun having gone down, the blaze from pistol and musket illumined the dusk of evening.”

Lt. Colonel Thom. Browne‘ report-
Feb. 22, 1864

“It was now near sundown, and the enemy was pressing closely upon our rear, the regiment formed in line of battle, a portion of it dismounted and sent to the support of the battery of the 4th Missouri regiment, which was in position. The dismounted men were soon afterwards ordered to their horses, and being again mounted, General Smith gave the order “charge”. No sooner had the command been given, than Major Beck with companies A, E and G and Major Febles with companies I, K, and M, rode rapidly and gallantly forward to the very lines of the enemy. The nature of the ground prevented an effective use of the sabre, but the pistol was substituted and did most excellent service.”

“In conclusion allow me to say that under the most trying and disheartening circumstances by which the command was surrounded, both officers and men behaved themselves admirably. To the officers both field and line, much credit is due for the coolness and alacrity with which they executed every order. Notwithstanding the disorder and confusion many times about it, the regiment was at no time disorganized or demoralized.
Respectfully submitted, Thom. M. Browne, Lt. Col. Comdg.”
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*************This Spring-2015, Marks the 150th Anniversary of the ‘END’ of the Civil War**************
________________________________________________________________________________________
…William Ware survived the horrors of War; so we now have the current and soon, the future generations…

 

William Montgomery Ware Obituary, 1901

William Montgomery Ware
Added by: t. garlow

Died.
At his home near Hershey,Neb. Oct. 5, 1901, William Montgomery Ware, aged 53 years, 1 month and 13 days.
Mr. Ware was born near Dublin Henry county, Ind., Aug.22,1848. When less than fifteen years of age he enlisted in the 7th Indiana Cavalry and served nearly three years, being discharged at the close of the war. In his early manhood he came to eastern Iowa, and in 1872 was united in marriage to Mrs. Mary Anderson. In a few years they moved to eastern Nebraska, then in 1886 to Lincoln county where they settled at their present home.
Mr. Ware was a consistent Christian. For many years he was a member of the United Brethren church but since coming here united with the M.E. church, there being no U.B. organization here. He was an active and beloved member of the church here, being one of the trustees since the erection of the church.
Mr. Ware had been in poor health for more (unreadable) ago was taken ill with catarrhal fever and congestion of the lungs. Everything possible for his recovery was done, but all efforts were in vain and Saturday morning at 9 o’clock he went peacefully Home. After being told Friday that he could not live he said, “God’s will be done,” and calmly gave directions as to his funeral, the settling of his estate, comforted each loved one individually, left messages for absent ones, and without fear or doubt entered the dark valley.
He leaves a wife, four sons, six daughters, and a sister, besides more distant relatives and hosts of friends to mourn his loss. all of his own family was with him at the time of his death excepting one son who had been here but, thinking his father out of danger, had returned to his home in the eastern part of the state.
The funeral was held at the home Sunday afternoon and in spite of the heavy rain was attended by a large number of sympathizing friends. Rev. Gilpin, pastor of the M.E. church, assisted by Rev. Evans of the Baptist church, conducted the funeral service, and the remains were laid to rest in Riverside cemetery.
Sympathy is extended to the sorrowing family and may they find comfort in his dying words, “Thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.”

1901 obituary from Glenn Montgomery.

Burial:
Riverside Cemetery
Hershey
Lincoln County
Nebraska, USA

Source:  Find A Grave

Maintained by: t. garlow
Originally Created by: David Goltry
Record added: Sep 02, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 58110167

 

John Elmer Ware (1886 – 1946)

John Elmer Ware
Added by: t. garlow

John E. Ware, who was down from Hershey Saturday, says that the returns from sugar beets are very satisfactory, the greater part of those so far shipped testing a percentage that gives the grower over five dollars per ton. The tonnage per acre varies, ten tons being about the average the section over.

from ‘The North Platte Semi-Weekly Tribune’ North Platte, Neb. Oct. 26, 1909.
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John E. Ware, a well known resident of the Hershey section and Miss Mabel Eshleman an equally popular young lady of the same place, will be united in marriage tomorrow.

from ‘The North Platte Semi-Weekly Tribune’ Feb. 22, 1910.
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John Ware has purchased the Olaf Hedlund 80-acre farm two miles north-west of Hershey for $10,000, or $125 per acre. The land is under irrigation and has fair improvements.

from ‘The North Platte Semi-Weekly Tribune’ Sept. 12, 1913.
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John Ware who purchased the Hedlund farm less than two years ago, has refused an offer of $25 advance per acre over the purchase price…
The Linstrom Bros.’ sale yesterday was attended by a large crowd and everything sold for good prices. Cattle sold exceptionally high, one milk cow bringing $100.50.–Hershey Times

from ‘The North Platte Semi-Weekly Tribune’ Jan. 22, 1915.
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WWI Registration Card
name: John Elmer Ware
home address: Hershey Nebraska
date of birth: Sept 15, 1886
born: Hershey, Neb, USA
occupation: Farmer
employer: Self
where employed: Hershey
married or single: married
height: Tall
build: Medium
eye color: Blue
date: June 5, 1917
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Burial:
North Platte Cemetery
North Platte
Lincoln County
Nebraska, USA

Isaac Everett Ware (1875 – 1935)

Isaac Everett Ware
Added by: t. garlow

Find A Grave photo

I. Everett Ware. Specific mention is made of many of the worthy citizens of Lincoln county within the pages of this work, citizens who have figured in the growth and development of this favored locality and whose interests have been identified with its every phase of progress, each contributing in his sphere of action to the well-being of the community in which he resides and to the advancement of its normal and legitimate growth. Among this number is he whose name appears above, peculiar interest attaching to his career from the fact that practically his entire life has been spent within the borders of this county.
1. Everett Ware, vice president of the Bank of Lincoln County at Hershey, was born in Mount Pleasant, on March 3, 1875, and is a son of William and Mary (Webb) Ware,…
Everett Ware received his elementary education in the public schools, completing his studies in York College, and then taking a commercial course in the Bryant & Stratton Business College at North Platte, Nebraska. During the following seven years he was engaged in the mercantile business in Hershey. For three years Mr. Ware again gave his attention to farming, at the end of which time he established a hardware and implement store in Hershey, but subsequently sold that and acquired and interest in the Bank of Lincoln County at Hershey, of which he is now vice president. He has devoted his close attention to the bank, and the splendid prosperity which that well known and influential institution enjoys is undoubtedly very largely due to his efforts and personal popularity. The Bank of Lincoln county has a capital of $25,000, a surplus of $6,000 and average deposits of $340,000, the deposits having more than doubled since Mr. Ware became connected with the bank two years ago.
Mr. Ware was married in 1903 to Bertha Pierson, a native of Nebraska, and to them three children have been born, namely: Floy and Marvin, both of whom are deceased, and Kenneth, at home.
Politically Mr. Ware gives his support to the democratic party, and he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America. He is a man of genial disposition and generous impulses and enjoys a marked popularity throughout the community with which his interests have been identified for many years.”

Burial:
Riverside Cemetery
Hershey
Lincoln County
Nebraska, USA

Hazel Elvera Ruth Hagemann Ware Obituary, 2013

Hazel E R <i>Hagemann</i> Ware
Added by: Roger Vick

Hazel E. R. Ware, 89 of Warrensburg, Missouri passed away Thursday, November 14, 2013 at St. Luke’s East Hospital in Lee’s Summit.

Hazel Elvera Ruth Hagemann was born February 1, 1924 on the family farm near Campbell, Nebraska, the daughter of Johann “John” Hagemann and Anna Katarina (Boehlke) Hagemann.

She went to work at Harvard Air Field in Harvard, Nebraska during World War II. She transferred to Ladd Army Air Force Base in Fairbanks, Alaska.

Hazel was united in marriage to Ray Eldon Ware on May 4, 1947 in Fairbanks.

Her husband’s military career took the couple all over the United States throughout the years. They lived in Topeka, KS; Shreveport, LA; Savannah, GA; Rapid City, SD; and New Jersey. When Ray retired from the United States Air Force in 1964, the couple moved to Springfield, Missouri.

In 1967, Hazel started her career with the U. S. Forestry Service. She moved to Peoria, IL in 1973 where she was employed with Agricultural Research. From 1975 to 1980, she resided in Russellville, AR where she resumed her career with the Forestry Service. Hazel eventually lived in Tallahasee, FL for a brief time prior to moving to Warrensburg in 1982.

She was in Civilian Personnel at Whiteman Air Force Base until retiring in 1984.

Hazel was member of Bethlehem Lutheran Church. She was an honorary member of Mary Martha Guild. She was also a member of Merry Widows Club, American Legion Auxiliary, Post #131 and Knob Noster Veterans of Foreign Wars.

She loved traveling and she visited many states throughout her life.

Survivors include two children: Daniel Ware and wife, Ginny of Hastings, NE and Debbie Ware of Warrensburg, MO; two grandchildren: Andrew Ware of Hasting, NE and Molly Carlson and husband, Kenny of St. Paul, NE; and several nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her husband, Ray; son: Michael Ware; Sister: Minna Hagemann and three brothers: Walter Hagemann, Irvin Hagemann and Albert Hagemann.

Funeral Service will be 1:00 p.m. Monday, November 18, 2013 at Bethlehem Lutheran Church in Warrensburg with Pastor Joel Kurz officiating.

Graveside Service will be 2:00 p.m. Tuesday, November 19, 2013 at Zion Lutheran Cemetery in Wanda Township, Nebraska.

Arrangements entrusted to Williams Funeral Chapel in Warrensburg.

Burial:
Zion Lutheran Cemetery
Macon
Franklin County
Nebraska, USA

Source:  Find A Grave

Created by: Roger Vick
Record added: Nov 15, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 120341301

Edward William Ware Obituary, 1922

Edward William Ware
Added by: t. garlow

Word was received here this morning of the death last night of Ed Ware at Hershey. Mr. Ware formerly was an engineer on the Fourth District but has been farming in the Hershey vicinity for some time. He has been sick only a short time. He leaves his wife and son Bryan in Hershey and a daughter, Hazel in Cheyenne. He was a brother of I. E. Ware and John Ware of Hershey, Ralph Ware of Cheyenne, Mrs Jennie Haist of Hershey, Mrs. A. E. McConnell of this city, Mrs. Arthur Harvey of Cheyenne and a son-in-law of Grant Dowhower of this city. The funeral arrangements could not be announced before going to press but will probably be held tomorrow.

Burial:
Riverside Cemetery
Hershey
Lincoln County
Nebraska, USA

Source:  The North Platte Semi-Weekly Tribune’ dated June 27,1922

Find A Grave

Created by: David Goltry
Record added: Aug 18, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 57320227